In an EU-wide online survey, 84 percent of the participants voted in favor of abolishing the time change.

In an EU-wide online survey, 84 percent of the participants voted in favor of abolishing the time change.

October) summer time ends. The hands are put back one more hour — from 3:00 a.m. to 2:00 a.m. Morning grouches get an extra hour of sleep. But how things will go with the time change in the EU is currently completely unclear.

In an EU-wide online survey, 84 percent of the participants voted in favor of abolishing the time change. Most of them voted for permanent summer time in 2018. 4.6 million responses, including three million from Germany alone, were received — a record, but still less than one percent of EU citizens.

Passned to the topic: The time change is really that unhealthy

The EU Commission had then proposed to abolish the change between summer and winter time from 2019. Instead, states should be able to decide for themselves whether they want permanent summer or winter time. However, concerns about this plan arose from many countries because, among other things, for the economy a uniform time zone seems desirable, at least in Central Europe. Otherwise, time differences between states would affect trade even more.

The European Parliament has also voted in favor of abolition after 2021. However, the majority of the member states still have to agree to this so that this can become a reality. Official Austria prefers constant daylight saving time as standard time.

EU states still undecided

But the discussions in the Council of EU States are still going on, said Erik Asplund, responsible at the Permanent Mission of Finland in Brussels. The Scandinavian country currently holds the Council Presidency. Nothing has changed in the positions. Above all, the states have expressed their concern that the Commission proposal lacks an impact assessment, stressed the diplomat.

In the whole of the EU, the clock has been filmed on the last Sunday in March — and back again on the last Sunday in October. Summer time was introduced in Europe in 1973 on the occasion of the oil crisis and with the aim of saving energy. With the time difference, one hour of daylight should be gained for companies and households. France made the start then.

Austria only decided to introduce it in 1979 because of administrative problems and because they wanted traffic-related harmonization with Switzerland and Germany. These two countries didn’t introduce daylight saving time until 1980. However, summer time already existed in the Alpine republic during the First World War. In 1916 it was in effect for the monarchy from May 1 to September 30, but was then discontinued. A second — in the long run unsuccessful — attempt was made between 1940 and 1948.

Read news for 1 month now for free! * * The test ends automatically. More on this ▶Win true wireless earphones from JBL now! (E-media.at) New access (yachtrevue.at) 8 reasons why it’s great to be single (lustaufsleben.at) Salmon shrimp burger with wasabi mayonnaise and honey cucumber (gusto .at) In the new trend: Shock-Down — how long can the economy withstand lockdowns? (trend.at) The 35 best family series for laughing and feeling good (tv-media.at) E-Scooter in Vienna: All providers and Prices 2020 in comparison (autorevue.at)

Daylight saving time ends on this Sunday (October 28th).paperhelp prices review The hands are put back one more hour — from 3:00 a.m. to 2:00 a.m. Morning grouches get an extra hour of sleep. But how things will go with the time change in the EU is currently completely unclear.

In an EU-wide online survey, 84 percent of the participants voted in favor of abolishing the time change. Most of them voted for permanent summer time in 2018. 4.6 million responses, including three million from Germany alone, were received — a record, but still less than one percent of EU citizens.

Passned to the topic: The time change is really that unhealthy

The EU Commission had then proposed to abolish the change between summer and winter time from 2019. Instead, states should be able to decide for themselves whether they want permanent summer or winter time. However, concerns about this plan arose from many countries because, among other things, for the economy a uniform time zone seems desirable, at least in Central Europe. Otherwise, time differences between states would affect trade even more.

The European Parliament has also voted in favor of abolition after 2021. However, the majority of the member states still have to agree to this so that this can become a reality. Official Austria prefers constant daylight saving time as standard time.

EU states still undecided

But the discussions in the Council of EU States are still going on, said Erik Asplund, responsible at the Permanent Mission of Finland in Brussels. The Scandinavian country currently holds the Council Presidency. Nothing has changed in the positions. Above all, the states have expressed their concern that the Commission proposal lacks an impact assessment, stressed the diplomat.

In the whole of the EU, the clock has been filmed on the last Sunday in March — and back again on the last Sunday in October. Summer time was introduced in Europe in 1973 on the occasion of the oil crisis and with the aim of saving energy. With the time difference, one hour of daylight should be gained for companies and households. France made the start then.

Austria only decided to introduce it in 1979 because of administrative problems and because they wanted traffic-related harmonization with Switzerland and Germany. These two countries didn’t introduce daylight saving time until 1980. However, summer time already existed in the Alpine republic during the First World War. In 1916 it was in effect for the monarchy from May 1 to September 30, but was then discontinued. A second — in the long run unsuccessful — attempt was made between 1940 and 1948.

Read news for 1 month now for free! * * The test ends automatically. More on this ▶Win true wireless earphones from JBL now! (E-media.at) New access (yachtrevue.at) 8 reasons why it’s great to be single (lustaufsleben.at) Salmon shrimp burger with wasabi mayonnaise and honey cucumber (gusto .at) In the new trend: Shock-Down — how long can the economy withstand lockdowns? (trend.at) The 35 best family series for laughing and feeling good (tv-media.at) E-Scooter in Vienna: All providers and Prices 2020 in comparison (autorevue.at)

Daylight saving time ends on this Sunday (October 28th). The hands are put back one more hour — from 3:00 a.m. to 2:00 a.m. Morning grouches get an extra hour of sleep. But how things will go with the time change in the EU is currently completely unclear.

In an EU-wide online survey, 84 percent of the participants voted in favor of abolishing the time change. Most of them voted for permanent summer time in 2018. 4.6 million responses, including three million from Germany alone, were received — a record, but still less than one percent of EU citizens.

Passned to the topic: The time change is really that unhealthy

The EU Commission had then proposed to abolish the change between summer and winter time from 2019. Instead, states should be able to decide for themselves whether they want permanent summer or winter time. However, concerns about this plan arose from many countries because, among other things, for the economy a uniform time zone seems desirable, at least in Central Europe. Otherwise, time differences between states would affect trade even more.

The European Parliament has also voted in favor of abolition after 2021. However, the majority of the member states still have to agree to this so that this can become a reality. Official Austria prefers constant daylight saving time as standard time.

EU states still undecided

But the discussions in the Council of EU States are still going on, said Erik Asplund, responsible at the Permanent Mission of Finland in Brussels. The Scandinavian country currently holds the Council Presidency. Nothing has changed in the positions. Above all, the states have expressed their concern that the Commission proposal lacks an impact assessment, stressed the diplomat.

In the whole of the EU, the clock has been filmed on the last Sunday in March — and back again on the last Sunday in October. Summer time was introduced in Europe in 1973 on the occasion of the oil crisis and with the aim of saving energy. With the time difference, one hour of daylight should be gained for companies and households. France made the start then.

Austria only decided to introduce it in 1979 because of administrative problems and because they wanted traffic-related harmonization with Switzerland and Germany. These two countries didn’t introduce daylight saving time until 1980. However, summer time already existed in the Alpine republic during the First World War. In 1916 it was in effect for the monarchy from May 1 to September 30, but was then discontinued. A second — in the long run unsuccessful — attempt was made between 1940 and 1948.

Read news for 1 month now for free! * * The test ends automatically. More on this ▶Win true wireless earphones from JBL now! (E-media.at) New access (yachtrevue.at) 8 reasons why it’s great to be single (lustaufsleben.at) Salmon shrimp burger with wasabi mayonnaise and honey cucumber (gusto .at) In the new trend: Shock-Down — how long can the economy withstand lockdowns? (trend.at) The 35 best family series for laughing and feeling good (tv-media.at) E-Scooter in Vienna: All providers and Prices 2020 in comparison (autorevue.at)

Wiener Linien is dressing up again: from today, Monday, the new fashion collection of the municipal public transport company is available. Anyone who suspects that the style is in the direction of the transport company uniform is wrong. Rather, it is streetwear that is more aimed at a younger audience.

The collection was designed together with Viennese designers and comprises a total of nine items, including jogging pants, a T-shirt, a windbreaker and a body. Belts, scarfs or shoulder bags are also available. The dominant color is black. A red and white logo of Wiener Linien, which was also redesigned for this purpose, acts as a splash of color.

© Wiener Linien

The sale of the pieces begins today at the release party in the Museumsquartier. The collection will then be on sale in the shop of the Remise Transport Museum.

© Wiener Linien

More information on the official homepage for the collection

Read news for 1 month now for free! * * The test ends automatically. More on this ▶Win true wireless earphones from JBL now! (E-media.at) New access (yachtrevue.at) 8 reasons why it’s great to be single (lustaufsleben.at) Salmon shrimp burger with wasabi mayonnaise and honey cucumber (gusto .at) In the new trend: Shock-Down — how long can the economy withstand lockdowns? (trend.at) The 35 best family series for laughing and feeling good (tv-media.at) E-Scooter in Vienna: All providers and Prices 2020 in comparison (autorevue.at)

Daylight saving time ends on this Sunday (October 28th). The hands are put back one more hour — from 3:00 a.m. to 2:00 a.m. Morning grouches get an extra hour of sleep. But how things will go with the time change in the EU is currently completely unclear.

In an EU-wide online survey, 84 percent of the participants voted in favor of abolishing the time change. Most of them voted for permanent summer time in 2018. 4.6 million responses, including three million from Germany alone, were received — a record, but still less than one percent of EU citizens.

Passned to the topic: The time change is really that unhealthy

The EU Commission had then proposed to abolish the change between summer and winter time from 2019. Instead, states should be able to decide for themselves whether they want permanent summer or winter time. However, concerns about this plan arose from many countries because, among other things, for the economy a uniform time zone seems desirable, at least in Central Europe. Otherwise, time differences between states would affect trade even more.

The European Parliament has also voted in favor of abolition after 2021. However, the majority of the member states still have to agree to this so that this can become a reality. Official Austria prefers constant daylight saving time as standard time.

EU states still undecided

But the discussions in the Council of EU States are still going on, said Erik Asplund, responsible at the Permanent Mission of Finland in Brussels. The Scandinavian country currently holds the Council Presidency. Nothing has changed in the positions. Above all, the states have expressed their concern that the Commission proposal lacks an impact assessment, stressed the diplomat.

In the whole of the EU, the clock has been filmed on the last Sunday in March — and back again on the last Sunday in October. Summer time was introduced in Europe in 1973 on the occasion of the oil crisis and with the aim of saving energy. With the time difference, one hour of daylight should be gained for companies and households. France made the start then.

Austria only decided to introduce it in 1979 because of administrative problems and because they wanted traffic-related harmonization with Switzerland and Germany. These two countries didn’t introduce daylight saving time until 1980. However, summer time already existed in the Alpine republic during the First World War. In 1916 it was in effect for the monarchy from May 1 to September 30, but was then discontinued. A second — in the long run unsuccessful — attempt was made between 1940 and 1948.

Read news for 1 month now for free! * * The test ends automatically. More on this ▶Win true wireless earphones from JBL now! (E-media.at) New access (yachtrevue.at) 8 reasons why it’s great to be single (lustaufsleben.at) Salmon shrimp burger with wasabi mayonnaise and honey cucumber (gusto .at) In the new trend: Shock-Down — how long can the economy withstand lockdowns? (trend.at) The 35 best family series for laughing and feeling good (tv-media.at) E-Scooter in Vienna: All providers and Prices 2020 in comparison (autorevue.at)

Wiener Linien is dressing up again: from today, Monday, the new fashion collection of the municipal public transport company is available. Anyone who suspects that the style is in the direction of the transport company uniform is wrong. Rather, it is streetwear that is more aimed at a younger audience.

The collection was designed together with Viennese designers and comprises a total of nine items, including jogging pants, a T-shirt, a windbreaker and a body.